Monday
Sep182017

2017-18 navel season

The 2017-18 season is rapidly approaching and should prove to be a banner year.  Although the crop is off from last year by 8% to 10%, fruit size and quality are as good as we have seen in a while.  

We were blessed with abundant rain fall this past winter and it has made our job of farming this crop a lot easier.  The results are healthy trees and good sized fruit to start the season.  Early testing show that the start of the navel season could be a week behind last season which would put the start around the 18th of October.  The 2017 valencias will finish about that time so hopefully there will be no gap in supply.  We will know more about the eating quality when we get closer to harvest in October, stay tuned...

 

Thursday
Jan262017

second application rules for Korea and China

California Citrus Exporters,

 

The California Citrus Quality Council (CCQC) is providing new information on how to comply with Korean and Chinese protocols regarding copper applications.

 

Significant rainfall in most growing regions has made it difficult for growers to make copper applications in compliance with the Korea and China protocols.  We are sending updated information that provides greater latitude for growers to make required treatments while maintaining compliance with the Korea and China protocols.

 

Korea (Septoria Spot)

 

The second copper application for control of Septoria Spot is due by Feb. 4.  Since rainfall has made it difficult for growers to make airblast applications of copper for Septoria Spot control, growers can still make the Feb. 4 deadline if growers make an aerial application of Quadris Top® (azoxystrobin/difenoconazole).  UC Riverside’s Jim Adaskaveg suggests the application be made by helicopter and that the pilots make the application at the slowest possible speed with the greatest amount of water possible.  These factors will improve efficacy.  There are MRLs for Quadris Top® in most major export markets.  Included below are MRLs for some major markets in case fruit must be diverted to another market besides Korea.

 

Additionally, we recommend that packinghouses and growers monitor groves for ice marks and submit samples to the NAVEK lab to screen for Septoria Spot infections.

 

Market

Active Ingredient

Published Commodity

Index Commodity

MRL (ppm)

Australia

Azoxystrobin

Citrus Fruits  

Orange, sweet

10

Canada

Azoxystrobin

Oranges

Orange, sweet

15

Codex

Azoxystrobin

Citrus fruits

Orange, sweet

15

Japan

Azoxystrobin

Orange (including navel orange)

Orange, sweet

10

Korea

Azoxystrobin

Citrus Fruits

Orange, sweet

10

United States

Azoxystrobin

Fruit, citrus, group 10-10

Orange, sweet

15

Canada

Difenoconazole

Oranges

Orange, sweet

0.8

Codex

Difenoconazole

Citrus fruits

Orange, sweet

0.6

Japan

Difenoconazole

Orange (including navel orange)

Orange, sweet

0.6

Korea

Difenoconazole

Citrus Fruits

Orange, sweet

0.6

United States

Difenoconazole

Fruit, citrus, group 10-10

Orange, sweet

0.6

 

China (Phytophthora)

 

Given the climatic conditions this season, the deadline for the second copper application for Navel and Valencia oranges in the San Joaquin Valley and southern California will be on Feb. 4.  The deadline for the first application of copper for early-season Valencia oranges grown in the desert region (Imperial County and Eastern Riverside and San Bernardino Counties) is Feb. 21.

 

Due to the frequency and volume of rainfall in the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California many growers have not been able get equipment into groves to make copper applications, so a significant amount of navel and Valencia orange acreage may not meet the China protocol deadlines.

 

APHIS has agreed to provide packers and growers additional options to comply with the protocol and still qualify shipments for export to China if certain additional conditions are met.

 

Valencia Oranges

 

Imperial County and Eastern Riverside and San Bernardino Counties (Expected harvest dates – Feb through April)

  • Copper applications must be made by Feb. 21.  There is likely to be sufficient time to make applications in this region, so no additional options are required at this time.

 

San Joaquin Valley and Southern California (Expected harvest dates – May through September)

  • Other measures in the China protocol must still be followed, such as skirt pruning, harvesting fruit above 20 inches and monitoring groves for disease one week prior to harvest at recommended threshold values for Tulare (0 diseased fruit/A) and other citrus-producing counties (<5 diseased fruit/A).

 

Navel Oranges

 

San Joaquin Valley and Southern California

  • Growers that are unable to make applications by the Feb. 4 deadline have the option to delay copper applications until Feb. 18.  However, if the copper application is delayed, exporting fruit to China from that grove must be delayed for 30 days from the date of the copper application.
  • Growers and packers that choose this option are also encouraged to monitor groves prior to harvest to assess the efficacy of the copper treatment and to avoid export of fruit from groves that exceed the Phytophthora threshold of Tulare (0 diseased fruit/A) and other citrus-producing counties (<5 diseased fruit/A).
  • A 30-day delay in harvesting would allow infections to develop and fall from the tree prior to harvest.
  • All other measures in the China protocol must be followed.

 

Please contact me by telephone at (530) 885-1894 or via e-mail jcranney@ccqc.org at if you have questions or need additional information.

 

Regards,

Jim

 

California Citrus Quality Council

853 Lincoln Way, Suite 206

Auburn, CA 95603

Tel:  (530) 885-1894

Fax: (530) 885-1546

James R. Cranney, President: jcranney@ccqc.org

Carleen Price, Executive Assistant: cprice@ccqc.org

www.ccqc.org

 

 

 

 

Friday
Oct312014

California Citrus Exporters:

 

The California Citrus Quality Council (CCQC) received notification this week that Korea’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS) has lowered the MRLs for 2,4-D from 2 ppm to .05 ppm for oranges, .15 for grapefruit and 1 ppm for lemons.  The new MRLs go into effect on Nov. 4 in Korea.

 

CCQC has been working with MFDS and the 2,4-D Task Force for the past two years to establish MRLs for 2,4-D in Korea.  It was our expectation that MFDS would harmonize the MRL with the U.S. tolerance of 3 ppm or the Codex MRL of 1 ppm.  However, MFDS set the MRLs considerably lower than the U.S. and Codex MRLs.

 

Included below is a table that shows the residues that result from various 2,4-D uses.  These values were derived from field trials conducted by CCQC to maintain the registration of 2,4-D on citrus in 1995.  While the residue trials indicate that residues are not likely to exceed the new MRL levels, commercial conditions can vary and errors can occur.  CCQC recommends that packinghouses conduct periodic residue sampling to confirm that Korean shipments are within the new MRL levels.

 

Additionally, given the uncomfortably low MRL for Korea, CCQC recommends packinghouses alert growers, packinghouse managers and field staff to take precautions and care in the use of 2-4,D.

 

CCQC plans to communicate our concerns to MFDS, and work with AMVAC representatives, the Foreign Agricultural Service and the Environmental Protection Agency to determine if the 2,4-D MRLs can be increased.

 

Please contact me by telephone at (530) 885-1894 or via e-mail at jcranney@calcitrusquality.org if you have questions or need additional information.

 

Regards,

Jim

 

 

 

U.S. Tolerance

New Korea MRL

Rate

PHI

Residue from Field Trials

Navel Oranges

3 ppm

.05 ppm

16 & 24 ppm

7 days

<.05 ppm

 

 

 

24 ppm w/ hydrated lime

7 days

<.05 ppm

Grapefruit

3 ppm

.15 ppm

24 ppm

7 days

<.05 ppm

 

 

 

24 ppm and 4 ppm w/oil

0 days after 4 ppm treatment

<.05 ppm

 

 

 

24 ppm and 4 ppm w/oil and 24 ppm

0 days after 24 ppm treatment

.0577-.079 ppm

Lemons

3 ppm

1 ppm

12 ppm

7 days

<.05 ppm

 

 

 

12 ppm and 500 ppm postharvest treatment

0 days after 500 ppm treatment

.34 -.593 ppm

 

 

 

12 ppm and 500 ppm postharvest treatment

28 days after 500 ppm treatment

.274-.448

 

 

 

12 ppm and 500 ppm postharvest treatment

56 days after 500 ppm treatment

.486-.639

 

 

 

12 ppm and 500 ppm postharvest treatment

112 days after 500 ppm treatment

.346-.531

Monday
Aug042014

China reopens to California Citrus

California Citrus Exporters,

 

The California Citrus Quality Council (CCQC) is contacting you to advise the industry that USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHS) has signed an agreement with China’s quarantine regulatory authority (AQSIQ) to reopen the Chinese market to California citrus effective today.  The agreement will be valid for two years, covering the 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 seasons.   If necessary, an additional agreement will be signed for the 2016-2017 season depending on an evaluation of the previous two seasons.  Additionally, Chinese technical officers will visit California in the first year to “conduct supervision and inspection” of Phytophthora mitigation measures applied to California citrus.

 

To comply with the agreement, the California industry must implement the following measures:

 

  • ·         Skirt prune trees
  • ·         Harvest only fruit that is higher than 50 cm (20 inches) from the ground
  • ·         Monitor for Phytophthora
  • ·         Apply at least one copper application after the first rainfall
  • ·         Make preventative copper applications based on rainfall, temperature and Phytophthora infection rate
  • ·         Packinghouses must screen and remove decayed fruit
  • ·        
  • ·        

 

We expect AQSIQ to closely monitor California citrus shipments on arrival, not only for Phytophthora infections, but pesticide residues.  We urge packinghouses to take every precaution to ensure that shipments meet all of China’s regulatory requirements.

 

CCQC, Sunkist and Citrus Mutual would like to acknowledge and thank APHIS and UC Riverside’s Jim Adaskaveg for their outstanding contributions in reopening the market.

 

Please contact me by telephone at (530) 885-1894 or via e-mail at jcranney@calcitrusquality.org if you have questions or need additional information.

 

Regards,

Jim

 

California Citrus Quality Council

853 Lincoln Way, Suite 206

Auburn, CA 95603

Tel:  (530) 885-1894

Fax: (530) 885-1546

James R. Cranney, President: jcranney@calcitrusquality.org

Carleen Price, Executive Assistant: cprice@calcitrusquality.org

http://www.calcitrusquality.org

 

 

Tuesday
Jun242014

Employee training, G.A.P. audits and export requirements

Thank you to all of our Growers who participated in last month’s Heat Safety Training and Tractor and ATV safety classes.  The turnout was very good for both meetings with most employers and their employees attending.  We will continue to hold these meetings every year.  Thank you to Buckman-Mitchell Insurance for sponsoring the two meetings.

Many of the preliminary Good Agricultural Practices (G.A.P.) audits are complete and most others have scheduled their audits.  We thank all of you for taking the time to become Global GAP certified. We realize that you are all doing most of this work anyway as part of your daily routine, but to document and allow the audits is very helpful in our efforts to stay at the forefront of ensuring our customers that they are receiving a safe product that is sustainably grown.

Please remember that all blocks need to be skirt pruned in order to participate in export shipments for the 2014-15 year.  Specifically, fruit for export to China cannot be picked under 20 inches but we believe this is a good requirement for all export destinations.  Copper sprays will again be required and we will keep you posted on the timing of these sprays.